Mike Tyson Responds To Usa Boxing’s Open-letter Attack

Fitness USA closes Dearborn club; members can got to Taylor location

“Your organization never attempted to contact me directly to discuss this matter. Had you done so, perhaps you would have a better understanding of my love for amateur boxing and my commitment to protect fighters by giving them the best possible opportunities this business can offer.” Butler, in his letter addressed to Tyson that was released to the media, said, “These young boxers are foregoing their Olympic hopes and the hopes of our nation in exchange for a professional boxing contract now. You are offering these athletes pennies on the dollar of what they could be worth with an Olympic medal, or even potentially just being an Olympian.” Tyson, a former amateur heavyweight champion who just missed making the 1984 U.S. Olympic team, defended his signing of 152-pound prospect Erickson Lubin on Tuesday, the day he turned 18. “No one knows better than I the pitfalls of amateur and professional boxing,” Tyson wrote. “This is precisely why I am compelled to make Iron Mike Productions a transparent company. Our priority is the well-being of our fighters and to produce the most exciting fights we can and in the process uplift the sport of boxing.” According to The Post, Tyson added, “I love my country and I love the liberties living in a democracy affords. These young fighters have worked diligently and deserve the right to pursue the best path they deem fit for themselves. Unfortunately, many of them can’t wait around for a very slim shot at Olympic glory.” Tyson said USA Boxing’s poor record of producing medalists in the last several Olympics might have something to do with young boxers deciding to forgo Olympic training for a pro career. “Our country hasn’t had a male boxing gold medalist since 2004 (Andre Ward) , which could be why many young hopefuls decide to turn professional sooner,” he wrote. He also wrote, “Many of these boxers are like me in that they are from poverty-stricken communities and boxing is their only way to a better life.

Mike Tyson

I WISH IT WOULD STAY OPEN. AND I’M VERY UPSET ABOUT IT. Ruth: FITNESS USA MEMBERS WERE SURPRISED TO SEE A LETTER ON THE DOOR TODAY SPELLING OUT THE SAD FACT, THE CLUB IS CLOSING. THE COMPANY SAYS FINANCIAL LOSSES HAVE MADE IT IMPOSSIBLE TO KEEP THE GYM OPEN. MEMBERS WILL BE ABLE TO USE THE FITNESS USA CLUB IN TAYLOR, ABOUT 8 MILES AWAY. IT’S ABOUT THE SAME DISTANCE FOR ME, SO SOME ARE INCONVENIENCED, BUT NOT ME. Ruth: THEY WILL WORK WITH INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS WHO MIGHT HAVE A PROBLEM WITH THE TAYLOR LOCATION. 15 PEOPLE WILL LOSE THEIR JOBS, AND THAT’S PART OF THE EMOTIONAL TOLL FOR THOSE WHO MIGHT NOT BE CLOSE FRIENDS BUT WERE USED TO SEEING THE SAME FRIENDLY FACES EACH DAY. I HAVE A LOT OF FRIENDS HERE. ONE OF THE WORKERS IN THERE, I’LL MISS HER. I DON’T KNOW HER NAME, BUT I’LL MISS HER. Ruth: FAN YOU’RE A MEMBER OF DEARBORN, Mich. – After 42 years, Fitness USA regretfully announced it will be closing its club on Michigan Avenue in Dearborn. A letter was posted on the front door, giving some members their first inkling their gym would be shutting its doors for good. “I don’t like it.

USA Today’s Pattern of Inaccuracy on Iran

But are these conditions unreasonable, and are they really obstacles to an agreement? That depends on who you ask. If you talk to neoconservatives who’ve nursed a decades-long hatred of Iran, you get different answers than if you ask scholars of international law or conflict resolution. So USA Today asked two neoconservatives. First Michael Rubin of the American Enterprise Institute: Those comments show that Rouhani is not serious, said Michael Rubin, a former Middle East expert at the Pentagon under President George W. Bush. “The more you complicate the issue, the more you’re setting up the talks to fail,” he said. And then: Michael Doran, a former Middle East adviser in the Bush White House, said Rouhani’s words about Israel are “a wise negotiating strategy” to present Iran as a victim of a Western double standard. If you didn’t know better, you might take away that Rouhani was sly and intransigent. In fact, what Rouhani is calling for is exactly what the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty calls for. The NPT, signed by the US and Iran, says that Iran, like all signatories, has a right to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes, and that nuclear-armed nations must disarm. Citing an international law expert in the piece might have cleared that up, and perhaps even pointed out that the US is in violation of the treaty. But a look at USA Today’s Iran coverage over time suggests the omission, and the misportrayal of Rouhani’s remarks as obstacles, are not mistakes, but rather part of a pattern of putting Iran in a bad light, sometimes at the expense of the truth. For instance, last June, after Rouhani won Iran’s presidential election, USA Today reported (FAIR Action Alert, 6/21/13 ) that the president-elect “is known for his negotiating skill over the country’s nuclear weapons program.” In fact, Rouhani represented Iran’s atomic energy program, but both Iran and a consensus of US intelligence agencies say Iran does not have a nuclear weapons program (New York Times, 2/24/12 ). Months later, USA Today ( 9/23/13 ) repeated the canard, reporting that Barack Obama was trying to “persuade Tehran to abandon its nuclear weapons program.” And today , USA Today is reporting that Rouhani said he was prepared to open negotiations with the United States and other nations on its nuclear program after years of refusing to allow inspection of its facilities. In fact, UN inspectors have been in and out of Iran for years, doing their jobs, with a few disputes (MERIP, 2/7/13 ), mostly based on Iran’s insistence, in accordance with the NPT, that military facilities with no evidence of nuclear activity are exempt from inspections. As Al-Monitor ( 7/22/13 ) reported: There are two to six IAEA inspectors on the ground in Iran every day, [deputy director of the International Atomic Energy Agency Herman] Nackaerts said, covering 16 Iranian facilities.

USA get hot start at Presidents Cup

While behind, the rally means it’s the Internationals – including Australians Scott, Jason Day and Marc Leishman – who take momentum into day two at Muirfield Village golf Club in Ohio. The Internationals were trailing in all six matches when a timely near-90 minute rain delay came to their aid and they took advantage of the momentum breaker as they came out swinging on the back nine. They were able to pull out two victories, the first coming when Jason Day drained a 20-foot birdie putt on the last hole and the second from South African duo Charl Schwartzel and Louis Oosthuizen. Day and Canadian Graham DeLaet surged back from three-down through six holes to come up trumps 1 up over Hunter Mahan and Brandt Snedeker while the South Africans were too good for Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley, coming from two down through seven to win 2 and 1. “I think what we showed today is that there’s plenty of heart on this team,” said Scott, who won three of the last four holes with Japanese rookie Hideki Matsuyama to snatch a half point against Bill Haas and Webb Simpson. “I don’t think spirits were low when we sat in the team room in the break, but for everyone to go out and rally, some guys to pull out wins, other guys halves, and even the matches we lost came closer all of a sudden was huge. “I think we should take a lot out of that. “We were in ordinary shape for a while, and 3.5 – 2.5 isn’t a big deal and if we win the session tomorrow we are neck and neck.” However, the visitors are far from out of the woods against Fred Couples’ Americans, a vastly stronger team on paper, as they pursue only the second victory for their team in the 10th staging of the biennial contest and the first on US soil. They still need to find a way to excel in the foursomes (alternate shot) format starting on day two. Since their lone outright win in 1998 the Internationals have been obliterated overall in alternate shot, earning just 18.5 points compared to the USA’s 46.5. International captain Price has stuck with the same teams from day one for the alternate shot. “It has generally been very hard for us in foursomes,” Price admitted. “But I think we have 12 wonderful ball strikers here.

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